What To Do During A Flood

What To Do During A Flood

  • Monitor streams and street flooding in cities. Look closely at small streams and low-lying areas for early flooding for those living in areas that are prone to localized flooding. Ensure that there are cleared street catch basins.
  • Heed evacuation mandates. Follow the recommended routes for evacuation; shortcuts may be blocked or hazardous.
  • Do not walk in flowing water. Drowning is the number one cause of death in floods. Most of these drownings occur during flash floods. Flash flood waters move at very fast speeds and can roll boulders, sweep away cars, tear down trees, destroy buildings, and obliterate bridges. Six inches of fast moving water can take you off your feet. Use a pole or stick to ensure that the ground is still there and sturdy, even where the water is not flowing, if you have to walk through a flooded area.
  • Don’t drive through flooded areas. More people are drowned in their cars than anywhere else. Cars can be swept away in just 2 feet of moving water.
  • Avoid power lines or electrical wires. Electrocution is also the main killer in floods. Electrical current can move through the water. Report downed power lines to your utility or local emergency manager.
  • Watching for animals , especially snakes. Small wild animals that have been flooded out of their homes may seek shelter in your homes. Use a pole or stick to poke and turn around and scare away small creatures.
  • Have a look before you step. After a flood, the floors and the floors are covered with debris, including broken bottles and nails. Floors and stairs covered in mud can be very slippery.
  • Be alert for gas leaks. Use a flashlight to inspect the damage. Do not smoke or use candles, lanterns or open flames unless you are sure the gas has been turned off and the area has been aired out.
  • Carbon monoxide exhaust is lethal. Only use outdoor camping stoves, generators or other gasoline-powered machines. Charcoal fumes are particularly deadly, so only use outdoors.